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Your actions make a difference. Take a stand for the future of medicine.

We can’t advance patient-centered innovation alone. Join us in our fight to protect patient access to medications and treatments and support the next generation of medical breakthroughs.

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Protect Innovation and Jobs

Between now and December 17, the World Trade Organization (WTO) is considering the TRIPS waiver, waiving requirements that foreign countries protect American intellectual property (IP) on COVID-19 treatments, as they did in June for American COVID-19 vaccines. The Biden Administration can stop the WTO from allowing this to happen.
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Hold Middlemen Accountable

Too many Americans struggle to afford the medicines and health care they need. But the drug pricing debate in Washington continues to ignore the broader pharmaceutical supply chain, including middlemen like insurers and pharmacy benefit managers (PBMs).

Protect Innovation and Jobs

Tell Congress: The Biden Administration Should Protect American Innovation and Jobs

Between now and December 17, the World Trade Organization (WTO) is considering waiving requirements to protect American intellectual property (IP) on COVID-19 treatments abroad, following a harmful and unnecessary decision in June to do the same for COVID-19 vaccines – referred to as the TRIPS waiver. This means that other countries, such as China and India, would be permitted to allow local companies to use the IP of American companies to make copycat COVID-19 treatments abroad. The Biden Administration can stop the WTO from allowing this to happen.

The Biden Administration should ensure that the WTO does not further undermine medical innovation by expanding the TRIPS waiver to treatments. Here’s why:

There is no supply shortage for COVID-19 treatments, and therefore no need to increase production abroad. Supply exceeds demand for COVID-19 treatments for all variants, disease severity and patient settings.

Global collaboration has succeeded in fighting COVID-19, with voluntary agreements providing access to treatments to more than 125 low- and middle-income countries.

Expansion of the TRIPS waiver would harm global health and America’s global competitiveness, economic and job security, and medical innovation leadership.

The Biden Administration must reject expansion of the TRIPS waiver to protect American jobs and instead focus on last-mile distribution and administration challenges around the world to make a real impact for people trying to access treatment for COVID-19.

Hold Middlemen Accountable

Tell Congress to Hold Middlemen Like Insurers and PBMs Accountable

Too many Americans struggle to afford the medicines and health care they need. And the problem has gotten worse in recent years as insurers increasingly use practices that shift costs to patients. But the drug pricing debate in Washington continues to ignore the broader pharmaceutical supply chain, including middlemen like insurers and pharmacy benefit managers (PBMs).

Unfortunately, Congress just passed a law that doesn't stop abusive insurance and PBM practices that are the real drivers of health care costs. Take insulin, for example. Last year, manufacturers provided deep discounts to insurers and PBMs that lowered the cost of the most commonly used insulins by 84% on average. These middlemen – not patients – have been the primary beneficiaries of these deep discounts. Patients deserve better.

Congress could meaningfully address patient access and affordability concerns if they pursued legislation that:

• Included the kind of accountability and transparency of PBMs that patients and employers need.
• Addressed a broken insurance system that is shifting more of the costs of medicines onto vulnerable patients.
• Took steps to ensure patients share in the deep discounts that PBMs and health plans receive.

Giving the federal government unprecedented, sweeping authority to set prices for our medicines was not the solution.

Congress must work on real solutions to make sure patients can afford their medicines at the pharmacy counter. That starts with holding insurers and middlemen accountable.